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Guardian Weekly

May 27 2022
Magazine

The Guardian Weekly magazine is a round-up of the world news, opinion and long reads that have shaped the week. Inside, the past seven days' most memorable stories are reframed with striking photography and insightful companion pieces, all handpicked from The Guardian and The Observer.

A hard rain • A crowd gathers beneath brooding skies at Uda ypur beach in West Bengal as heavy pre-monsoon rains hit parts of northern India last weekend. After weeks of baking heat, the India Meteorological Department forecast an early start to the rainy season due to the impact of two cyclones, Asani and Karim.

Food for thought, Australia’s green turn and the Disney Pistols

Headlines from the last seven days

DEATHS

SCIENCE AND ENVIRONMENT

United Kingdom

A ticket for one

THE COMING STORM • Experts are sounding dire warnings about food insecurity and rising prices as war in Ukraine, climate change and inflation all take their toll. Is it too late to avert a global catastrophe?

RUNNING ON EMPTY • Five ways food and security overlap

How return of school gave hope to traumatised villagers

Any ceasefire deal ceding territory is ruled out

Lesson time

Carry on Boris? Johnson’s survival superpower can only last so long • Some Tory stalwarts may be angry about the dramas at No 10, but the state of the economy could be what brings the prime minister down

Under pressure Will embattled PM slip free again after latest party images?

Over and out The sad last days of the forest skink

How a green corridor could save a deer in peril • Only 1,500 huemul remain, but rewilding swathes of land may help the animal that appears on Chile’s coat of arms

New PM vows change but flags ‘difficult’ Chinaties

Out of road The rightwing Coalition paid the price for its ‘war’ on climate action

Monkeypox What is it, and should the world be worried?

Recycling plan aims to stub out cigarette littering

Land parcels Amazon HQ plans divide Indigenous groups

‘A struggle to survive’: why tourists’ return is essential

Curious orange • Curcumin, a chemical extracted from the spice turmeric, could be a natural treatment for illnesses ranging from osteoporosis to cancer. What’s puzzling scientists is how to get it into the bloodstream in sufficiently high volumes

‘A global catastrophe’ Women will suffer if court upends Roe • Activists warn that antichoice groups will thrive if 1973 ruling is overturned – especially in developing world

Maduro glimpses a lifeline as US eases sanctions

Who owns Einstein’s face? • Thanks to a savvy California lawyer, Albert Einstein has earned far more posthumously than he ever did in his lifetime. But is that what the great scientist would have wanted?

Life after death • Lou Sedaris was a difficult man who had always baffled his children. So when he died at 98, where would they begin with his funeral?

The banks collapsed in 2008 – our food trade could go the same way George Monbiot

A Marcos back in power is a warning to the whole world Nicole Curato

#MeToo is over if we don’t listen to victims like Amber Heard Martha Gill

As western countries retreat from international aid, China is set to swoop

Letters

Anarchy on the TV • How do you make a drama about the godfathers of punk when their lead singer is taking you to court and your cast has barely heard of them? Director Danny Boyle reveals all

The many other moods of Munch • There was far more to the Norwegian master than The Scream, as a collection of his other works – on show outside Scandinavia for the first time – reveals

All the world’s their stage • Back to Back, a company of disabled and neurodiverse actors, came from...


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English

The Guardian Weekly magazine is a round-up of the world news, opinion and long reads that have shaped the week. Inside, the past seven days' most memorable stories are reframed with striking photography and insightful companion pieces, all handpicked from The Guardian and The Observer.

A hard rain • A crowd gathers beneath brooding skies at Uda ypur beach in West Bengal as heavy pre-monsoon rains hit parts of northern India last weekend. After weeks of baking heat, the India Meteorological Department forecast an early start to the rainy season due to the impact of two cyclones, Asani and Karim.

Food for thought, Australia’s green turn and the Disney Pistols

Headlines from the last seven days

DEATHS

SCIENCE AND ENVIRONMENT

United Kingdom

A ticket for one

THE COMING STORM • Experts are sounding dire warnings about food insecurity and rising prices as war in Ukraine, climate change and inflation all take their toll. Is it too late to avert a global catastrophe?

RUNNING ON EMPTY • Five ways food and security overlap

How return of school gave hope to traumatised villagers

Any ceasefire deal ceding territory is ruled out

Lesson time

Carry on Boris? Johnson’s survival superpower can only last so long • Some Tory stalwarts may be angry about the dramas at No 10, but the state of the economy could be what brings the prime minister down

Under pressure Will embattled PM slip free again after latest party images?

Over and out The sad last days of the forest skink

How a green corridor could save a deer in peril • Only 1,500 huemul remain, but rewilding swathes of land may help the animal that appears on Chile’s coat of arms

New PM vows change but flags ‘difficult’ Chinaties

Out of road The rightwing Coalition paid the price for its ‘war’ on climate action

Monkeypox What is it, and should the world be worried?

Recycling plan aims to stub out cigarette littering

Land parcels Amazon HQ plans divide Indigenous groups

‘A struggle to survive’: why tourists’ return is essential

Curious orange • Curcumin, a chemical extracted from the spice turmeric, could be a natural treatment for illnesses ranging from osteoporosis to cancer. What’s puzzling scientists is how to get it into the bloodstream in sufficiently high volumes

‘A global catastrophe’ Women will suffer if court upends Roe • Activists warn that antichoice groups will thrive if 1973 ruling is overturned – especially in developing world

Maduro glimpses a lifeline as US eases sanctions

Who owns Einstein’s face? • Thanks to a savvy California lawyer, Albert Einstein has earned far more posthumously than he ever did in his lifetime. But is that what the great scientist would have wanted?

Life after death • Lou Sedaris was a difficult man who had always baffled his children. So when he died at 98, where would they begin with his funeral?

The banks collapsed in 2008 – our food trade could go the same way George Monbiot

A Marcos back in power is a warning to the whole world Nicole Curato

#MeToo is over if we don’t listen to victims like Amber Heard Martha Gill

As western countries retreat from international aid, China is set to swoop

Letters

Anarchy on the TV • How do you make a drama about the godfathers of punk when their lead singer is taking you to court and your cast has barely heard of them? Director Danny Boyle reveals all

The many other moods of Munch • There was far more to the Norwegian master than The Scream, as a collection of his other works – on show outside Scandinavia for the first time – reveals

All the world’s their stage • Back to Back, a company of disabled and neurodiverse actors, came from...


Expand title description text